sthirunahari
07 Dec '17, 11pm

In large organizations, you’ll often see the deployment of large-scale network firewalls designed to protect an organization’s environment f

The term “firewall” is not new. It is common terminology in the world of technology and security, and possibly common enough that even non-technical people have a basic understanding of what a firewall is. Its meaning actually extends beyond security.

The brick walls that divide different sections of a building are called firewalls.  We even have firewalls in our cars. They’re the metal wall that separates the engine and passenger compartments.

The term transcends multiple industries because it’s so indicative of what is happening.  Regardless of industry, the core function has always been to separate two different spaces. Those spaces have always had two core purposes 1. To keep something out      2. To keep something in    
The term is used so interchangeably in security discussion, especially website security, that it can be confusing. 
There are many kinds of a firewall, such as our own website application firewall. Many attribute firewalls to functioning the same, this is false. When it comes to websites/servers/networks they fall into three distinct domains that I feel are important to differentiate. 
There are three categories to account for when thinking about Firewalls:
• Network • Local • Application
Network Firewalls In large organizations, you’ll often see the deployment of large-scale network firewalls designed to protect an organization’s environment from unauthorized access to a specific environment.

What is Firewall
Network Firewalls are what we’re most familiar with. You can find them in our home routers, protecting our trusted zone (home network) from an untrusted zone (the internet). 
In large organizations, you’ll see similar configurations, but with additional firewalls as well that isolate different parts of a network, protecting their network assets (trusted zones). These firewalls are designed to look at network connection attempts to various network ports, as well as analyze incoming packets and their associated metadata. Based on rules, the firewall then determines what is and isn’t allowed into the environment they are protecting.